How to make it: instructions, recipes, common hiccups & more

We recommend using a food scale! Using a scale makes it easier to measure your ice cream mix more reliably. This helps you make more consistent, delicious ice cream every time (here’s one we recommend)!

WATCH THIS FIRST—DON’T SKIP!

SCROLL DOWN TO SEE TROUBLESHOOTING TIPS

ICE CREAM BASE RECIPES

Important note on sweetness: we do our best to cater to everyone’s taste, but you may find you want your ice cream a bit more sweet. If you do, we recommend adding a touch of stevia powder to your base (here’s one we recommend). You can also add more ice cream mix, but too much can affect the texture.

FIT SWEET TREATS RECIPE CARDS

TROUBLESHOOTING TIPS

Choose the preparation method you need help with (click to jump to section):

Don’t hesitate to reach out to [email protected] for help!

Ice cream maker troubleshooting:

Try these tips:

  • Ensure your churning bowl is frozen for at least 12 hours (longer is better).
  • Set your freezer to the lowest setting (at least 2°F, but lower is better).
  • Make sure your ice cream base is chilled enough. Chill in the coldest part of your fridge for at least 2½  hours and put in freezer for 15-20 minutes before churning.
  • Add an ice cube to your ice cream base to cool it down before churning.
  • Use a smaller amount of ice cream base when you start churning (this makes it easier for the churning bowl to freeze things).

For larger ice cream makers (like some Cuisinart models) this is caused by the machine’s rapid churning (basically, air is being whipped into the base before it has time to fully freeze). To fix this, try turning the machine off before too much air is incorporated. Then, cover the bowl and let freeze for 10-15 minutes. After that, turn the machine back on to briefly mix before serving. Using a partial amount of a higher fat liquid in your ice cream base (e.g. whole milk or half and half) can also help with the texture.

Try these tips:

  • Churn for a shorter amount of time.
  • Chill ice cream base for a shorter amount of time.
  • Increase freezer temperature slightly (make sure it’s still below 0°F).

Try these tips:

  • Put the paddle in the ice cream base, turn the machine on and start churning immediately after you add the base to the churning bowl (waiting can cause the base to freeze and stick to the sides).
  • Keep your hand on the top of the machine for the first minute or so of churning to ensure it doesn’t come loose.

Stir in more powdered mix once the ice cream is done to make it sweeter. Alternatively, add extra sweetener of your choice (this will stretch your ice cream mix a bit further).

Use less powdered mix next time to make it less sweet.

Try these tips:

  • Use a little less ice cream mix and add some extra sweetener of your choice (e.g. stevia or monkfruit). This will reduce the amount of salt without compromising on taste/sweetness.
  • Use a liquid that is higher in fat for your base (e.g. 2% milk, extra creamy oatmilk, coconut milk or adding a splash of half and half). Fat coats our taste buds and dulls flavors like saltiness, so this would reduce the salty taste.

Ninja CREAMi troubleshooting:

Try these tips:

  • Freeze your ice cream base for longer (ideally, 24 hours)
  • Lower the temperature of your freezer to below 0°F (-5°F is best)
  • If you re-spun the base multiple times, try 1 less re-spin next time (reduce the number of re-spins until mixture is as thick/creamy as you’d like)

Try these tips:

  • Push the re-spin button to churn the base another time (you may need to re-spin 3 or more times depending on how cold your freezer is)
  • If re-spinning doesn’t work, add a splash more of your dairy or plant milk of choice, then re-spin once again

Try these tips:

  • Add extra sweetener of your choice (for example, stevia or monkfruit drops) and re-spin
  • For your next batch, try adding more powder or less liquid for added sweetness

Use less powdered mix next time to make it less sweet.

Try these tips:

  • Use a little less ice cream mix and add some extra sweetener of your choice (e.g. stevia or monkfruit). This will reduce the amount of salt without compromising on taste/sweetness.
  • Use a liquid that is higher in fat for your base (e.g. 2% milk, extra creamy oatmilk, coconut milk or adding a splash of half and half). Fat coats our taste buds and dulls flavors like saltiness, so this would reduce the salty taste.

Try spinning on the “ICE CREAM” setting instead of “LITE ICE CREAM.”

Blender method troubleshooting:

Here are some tips:

  • Make sure you’re using the right amount of ice (refer to video or recipes above). Consider measuring out the ice, water and powdered mix with a scale.
  • Be sure you’re not using an older or bullet-style blender. The best blenders for making ice cream have an adjustable speed dial (we linked to a good quality, affordable option below if you’re interested in getting a new blender).
  • Salvage the base by using it to make ice cream using the “freezer” method (refer to the video above).

An air bubble has likely formed at the base of the blender. Turn the blender off, use a spoon to stir the mixture and release the bubble. Then, begin blending again starting at the lowest setting and gradually increasing the speed.

You likely need to increase the blender speed. Gradually increase the speed to create a vortex. Increase the speed more rapidly if necessary or consider adding a splash of water, mixing and then begin blending once again.

Try blending at a lower speed for a longer amount of time. The higher speed you use to blend your ice cream, the lighter it will be.

Add more powdered mix once the ice cream is done and blend on low to make it sweeter. Alternatively, add extra sweetener of your choice (this will stretch your ice cream mix a bit further).

Use less powdered mix next time to make it less sweet.

Try these tips:

  • Use a little less ice cream mix and add some extra sweetener of your choice (e.g. stevia or monkfruit). This will reduce the amount of salt without compromising on taste/sweetness.
  • Use a liquid that is higher in fat for your base (e.g. 2% milk, extra creamy oatmilk, coconut milk or adding a splash of half and half). Fat coats our taste buds and dulls flavors like saltiness, so this would reduce the salty taste.

Mix in more ice and water to loosen the ice cream mixture. If issue persists, try another preparation method.

Freezer method troubleshooting:

Try these tips:

  • Continue to freeze for 15 minute intervals, taking it out to mix thoroughly and make smooth—repeat until thickened.
  • Turn the freezer temperature down to a lower setting (-5°F is best).
  • Use a wider container with more surface area. This allows the base to freeze faster.

Use a silicone spatula to mix the mixture very thoroughly between freezing. Smash the frozen pieces vigorously to make smooth and incorporate into the rest of the base. Stirring very fast and “whipping” the ice cream in a circular motion will make it smoother—especially as it freezes and becomes thicker.

Stir in more powdered mix once the ice cream is done to make it sweeter. Alternatively, add extra sweetener of your choice (this will stretch your ice cream mix a bit further).

Use less powdered mix next time to make it less sweet.

Try these tips:

  • Use a little less ice cream mix and add some extra sweetener of your choice (e.g. stevia or monkfruit). This will reduce the amount of salt without compromising on taste/sweetness.
  • Use a liquid that is higher in fat for your base (e.g. 2% milk, extra creamy oatmilk, coconut milk or adding a splash of half and half). Fat coats our taste buds and dulls flavors like saltiness, so this would reduce the salty taste.

Try adding less powder when you make your next batch. Taste the ice cream base before freezing. If it isn’t quite sweet enough, add some extra sweetener of your choice (e.g. stevia or monkfruit).

PRODUCT RECOMMENDATIONS

Appliances:

The Ninja CREAMi
Makes the best ice cream (easiest method)
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Use a food scale 
Recommend a scale to make your base
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Our recommended blender
Great quality for a reasonable price
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Pint ice cream maker
Make ice cream anytime while saving money
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1.5 quart ice cream maker
Make ice cream anytime while saving money
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Quart ice cream maker
Make ice cream anytime while saving money
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Ingredients:

Stevia sweetener
Add sweetness to your ice cream
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Leos cookies
A healthy alternative to Oreos
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Highkey chocolate candies
A healthy alternative to M&Ms
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Chocolate peanut butter bar
Healthy Butterfingers dupe
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Cinnamon apple pie puffs
Crunchy sweet treat
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Mini strawberry cheesecakes
Keto-friendly cheesecakes
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Choczero chocolate syrup
Low-carb chocolate syrup
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Zero-sugar whipped cream
Keto-friendly whipped cream
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Sugar-free strawberry jam
By Good Good
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Quest Cookies
Healthy cookies (keto-friendly)
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Mint chocolate chip bars
By Power Crunch bar
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Sugar-free sprinkles
By Good Dee’s
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Orange water enhancer
By MiO
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Acai berry smoothie packs
By Sambazon
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Last updated: June, 2024

The sweeteners used in our Fit Sweet ice cream mix were selected based on the most up to date and vetted studies, FDA guidance and safety consensus supported by the preponderance of current scientific data5,6. The combination of erythritol, allulose and stevia leaf extract has consistently been shown to be by far the least impactful, safest and most well-tolerated sugar-free and low-carb sweetener blend available today1,2. They are excreted unmetabolized and unchanged even at high doses after consumption—demonstrating their non-impact on our bodies3. These sweeteners are derived naturally and can be found in everyday foods like melons, pears, grapes, figs, maple syrup, soy sauce, miso and wine1,2,4.

1Mazi TA, Stanhope KL. Erythritol: An In-Depth Discussion of Its Potential to Be a Beneficial Dietary Component. Nutrients. 2023 Jan 1;15(1):204. doi: 10.3390/nu15010204. PMID: 36615861; PMCID: PMC9824470.
2Yuma T, Tokuda M, Nishimoto N, Yokoi H, Izumori K. Allulose for the attenuation of postprandial blood glucose levels in healthy humans: A systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS One. 2023 Apr 6;18(4):e0281150. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0281150. PMID: 37023000; PMCID: PMC10079081.
3I.C Munro, W.O Bernt, J.F Borzelleca, G Flamm, B.S Lynch, E Kennepohl, E.A Bär, J Modderman, Erythritol: an interpretive summary of biochemical, metabolic, toxicological and clinical data, Food and Chemical Toxicology, Volume 36, Issue 12, 1998, Pages 1139-1174, ISSN 0278-6915
4Chowdhury AI, Rahanur Alam M, Raihan MM, Rahman T, Islam S, Halima O. Effect of stevia leaves (Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni) on diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis of preclinical studies. Food Sci Nutr. 2022 Apr 24;10(9):2868-2878. doi: 10.1002/fsn3.2904. PMID: 36171777; PMCID: PMC9469865.
5Cramer T, Gonder U, Kofler B. Plasma erythritol and cardiovascular risk: is there evidence for an association with dietary intake? Front Nutr. 2023 May 23;10:1195521. doi: 10.3389/fnut.2023.1195521. PMID: 37287998; PMCID: PMC10242034.
6Peterson K, Ayoob, K. CCC Statement on “The Artificial Sweetener Erythritol and Cardiovascular Event Risk”. Calorie Control Council. 2023 Feb.

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